Is “acceptably non-dystopian” self-sovereign identity even possible?

Wild stuff. I’ve done only the smallest amount of reading and thinking about topics like online identity. This article has shown me that there is a whole lot more to consider. When she writes the following in her conclusion it’s clear to me that we have a long way to go before we get trusted, reliable, private, and secure identity services.

I’m a software engineer and computer nerd, and I don’t trust myself to self-custody this data.

Molly White

https://blog.mollywhite.net/is-acceptably-non-dystopian-self-sovereign-identity-even-possible/

What might degrowth computing look like? – Critical Studies of EDUCATION & TECHNOLOGY

https://criticaledtech.com/2022/04/08/what-might-degrowth-computing-look-like/

A bunch of terms that I’ve never heard before but, in retrospect, should have been on my radar before now: permacomputing, collapse informatics, and CWL (computing within limits), degrowth.

Remedying Racial Inequity

There is a lot to think about in this video lecture by David C. Wilson, Dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy from Robert Reich’s Wealth and Poverty class at U.C. Berkeley. It’s about the science behind racial resentment and justice. It surprised me by alluding to psychological similarities between people who want to keep our structurally racist systems and people to want to get rid of them – both appeal to a sense of fairness but with very different results.

Lisa Genova: How your memory works — and why forgetting is totally OK | TED Talk

I found this a very encouraging TED talk. I’m putting this here so that I don’t forget it or, if I do, I’ll be able to find it again. By spending this much attention on it maybe it’ll be a little easier to remember when I need to.

Book Bans and Fascism

With all the news about banning books — Maus and Critical Race Theory and the 1619 Project, etc. — it’s hard to keep an even keel. This is a useful outcome… for fascists and white supremacists. But it’s also a sign of their weakness. Read Dr. Lisa Corrigan’s explanation.

Is Freedom White? | Boston Review

My first impression on reading the title of this article, Is Freedom White, was puzzlement. How could a concept like freedom be associated with whiteness?

Intrigued, I read it and I urge you to read it, too. I learned that what I mean when I use the word “freedom” is subtly but significantly different from what some other people mean.

For me, at the simplest level, freedom is the ability to do what I want to do. But there’s a context that goes along with that: If I’m free to do something then all others are also free to do that thing, too. If I can do something that others aren’t allowed to do or are otherwise constrained from doing it then it’s my privilege, not my freedom.

Contrarywise, some people feel that if they can’t do something – even if it results in the oppression of other people – then their freedom is being denied and they are being oppressed.

This is where the “White” definition of freedom starts. It’s a sense of entitlement unconstrained by it’s deleterious effects on others. And, of course, this isn’t restricted to racialized oppression.

This has me wondering, though, if my definition of freedom isn’t more of a ideal. Maybe it’s a lofty though ultimately unattainable goal. Maybe we can’t have it in its purest form. We struggle toward freedom rather than reside in a state of freedom.

If you have come here to help me, you are wasting your time. But if you have come because your liberation is bound up with mine, then let us work together.

Attributed to Willa Watson (though she’s reluctant to accept sole credit for it)

I’m going to have to revisit this article occasionally.